As a writer and a storyteller, reading is essential—it’s the raw material of my craft. This is a list of books I’m reading and I’ve read since January of 2020. If you’re on Goodreads, you can follow me here. You can check out my posts about books I’ve read here.

 

2020

📖 Reading now

📖 Big Wonderful Thing: A History of Texas by Stephen Harrigan. The title is right. This is a big, wonderful read. It’s a history of Texas that tells the history of this incredible state through the eyes of those who lived it. It looks at the atrocities and the triumphs alike with sober-minded realism. If you love Texas—or are simply intrigued by it—this is a great read.

📖 Adorning the Dark: Thoughts on Community, Calling, and the Mystery of Making by Andrew Peterson. This has been an incredibly encouraging and enlightening read. I’m looking forward to sharing my thoughts when I’m done.

🎧 The Eye of the World by Robert Jordan. After years of getting recommendations for the classic Wheel of Time fantasy series, I’ve decided it’s time to check it out. I can’t write in the genre and not be familiar with such a foundational author and series.

📚 Read

📖 Keep Going by Austin Kleon. I don’t know if Kleon thinks of his last three books (Steal Like an Artist, Show Your Work, and this one) as a trilogy or not, but I do. This was an incredibly inspiring read right when I needed it. It’s somehow practical and inspirational at the same time. I’d recommend Kleon’s creative trilogy to any artist—working or aspiring. You can read my full thoughts in it here.

📖 Endure by Alex Hutchinson. A fascinating survey of the available research on human endurance and told with an engaging voice. If you are interested in the pursuit of human limitations, this is for you.

📖 Star Wars: Aftermath by Chuck Wendig. An okay novel set after the original trilogy. The setting and plot are thoroughly Star Wars, but the characters are one dimensional and not very interesting. It’s the first novel in a series, but I won’t be reading further.

📖 Run Forever by Amby Burfoot. Trying to get back to a steady running habit at 42 is not easy, and Burfoot has been a fixture of the running wisdom that has guided me on and off since middle school cross country. I loved his previous books and his work for Runner’s World, and this book was no different. This book is a delightful bit of wisdom from someone who is still running late into life.