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Then Manwë spoke and said: ‘Hearest thou, Fëanor son of Finwë, the words of Yavanna? Wilt thou grant what she would ask?’

There was long silence, but Fëanor answered no word. Then Tulkas cried: ‘Speak, O Noldo, yea or nay! But who shall deny Yavanna? And did not the light of the Silmarils come from her work in the beginning?’

But Aulë the Maker said: ‘Be not hasty! We ask a greater thing than thou knowest. Let him have peace yet awhile.’

But Fëanor spoke then, and cried bitterly: ‘For the less even as for the greater there is some deed that he may accomplish but once only; and in that deed his heart shall rest. It may be that I can unlock my jewels, but never again shall I make their like; and if I must break them, I shall break my heart, and I shall be slain; first of all the Eldar in Aman.’ 

The passage above is one of the most moving to me from The Silmarillion by J.R.R. Tolkien.  As someone who has been wired to be a “maker”, I get what Aule and Feanor are feeling. They both understand the love a maker has for his creation.

How we see the art of others

When Tulkas cannot see how anyone could not crack open the Silmarils that Feanor had crafted he was seeing the utility of the jewels. He saw them as backup of the light within them, not as unique pieces of craftsmanship on their own. The idea that the Silmarils may have some value to Feanor beyond the sum of the parts seems to be foreign to him.

But Aule is different. Being a Maker himself he understands the draw of the work of the artist. He understands what it is like to look upon something that did not exist before you made it. This compels him to show Feanor grace. Sure, they need an answer and it is probably the best idea to take the light from the Silmarils to bring the Trees back. But he did not push Feanor. He counseled the other Valar to give him time, because he knows how brutal this decision is. This reminds me strongly of the biblical image of a loving Father looking down on us.

How we are taken in by our own art

But now we turn to Feanor. He loved his art, but in the end he loved it more than he loved the Valar and his fellow elves. He took the Silmarils and ran, and eventually they end up in the hands of Morgoth. Then, the Valar and the Elves have neither.

This is what greed brings us. As sinful, fallen humans we will always be disposed to love our creations too much. To claim ownership, to set them on a shelf to never be used nor shared. This is wrong and harmful. In contrast to the gracious view we see in Aule, here we see the selfish love of man for his own creations. Think the golden calf from Exodus. 

Tolkien gets it

As a committed Catholic and artist Tolkien is perfectly positioned to understand this and pass it along to us. There is great beauty and truth in the Silmarillion, even if reading it can be a bit of a slog at times. 

If you are an artist, I suggest picking this book up and taking another (or your first) spin through it. I think you appreciate the artistry and the point of view.