Serial blew up the podcasting world last fall. For many, many people Serial was their first impression of podcasting. For many others, myself included, it was a very visible step forward in a medium that has been full of less visible, but even more important, steps forward for the last 10 years.

Serial is a very different show than the one that formed my first impression of podcasting, Adam Curry’s The Daily Source Code in 2005. The public radio polish and production quality is miles ahead of those original podcasts, and of many popular shows today. Many old guard podcast folks from the tech world scoffed at Serial as nothing new, just an evolution of one of the most popular radio shows-turned-podcasts in the world, This American Life.

They might be right, but I don’t care if that’s true. In the more traditional world of tech podcasting there a few new shows who are taking their cue from public radio-style storytelling podcasts. Because these are shows without public radio budgets and they are still doing top-notch work, they are the ones really driving the medium forward. Where Serial may have been the general public’s introduction to podcasting, shows like Inquisitive, The Record and Welcome to Macintosh are podcasting’s introduction to storytelling.

I am sure that there are other shows doing similar work, but these are shows that made their appearance in my corner of the internet, in this case the Apple fanboy section. Inquisitive rebooted the show in episode #27: Behind the App #1. The show evolved from its one-on-one interview style to a story-driven format featuring multiple guests and telling one long story over the course of many episodes. By documenting the history of the iTunes App Store and the app industry up to the current moment, Myke Hurley is creating a valuable historical record while also weaving a compelling narrative. Along with Welcome to Macintosh (currently on episode #1) and last year’s The Record from Brent Simmons and Chris Parrish will document one of the most interesting aspects of the (current) world’s most valuable company.

My hope is that more and more podcast producers, and people who aren’t making shows yet, are inspired by this growing number of shows that tell compelling stories in long form. Storytelling is a powerful medium. Narrative stories connect with people in ways that nothing else can. I hope that this is the beginning of a new renaissance in storytelling, and podcasts lead the way. The podcasting world and all of us will be better off for it.