The first book I finished for my goal of 35 books in 2015 was 'It's All Too Much' by Peter Walsh. I never would have chosen this book on my own. From the cheesy cover to the author's sweet spot of helping hoarders, it strikes me as a book I just don't need to read. Enter Merlin Mann, gentleman about the Internet.

In Back to Work episode #202, Merlin mentioned this book along with 'Getting Things Done' by David Allen as the two books that influence him greatly and he continues to recommend to everyone. Being a big fan of Merlin and the other book, I immediately ordered this one from Amazon. It was a good call.

This book could help anyone, provided you realize one thing: clutter in your life is everyone's problem, not just the hoarders on TV. If you can open this book with an honest intent to listen, there is good stuff to be found here.

First, Walsh's philosophy will sound very familiar to Christians. His basic premises are:

  • We all have too much stuff
  • The stuff you own, will end up owning you
  • Clutter is not about your stuff, but about how you see your stuff

This is true. Mankind is bent to love created things more than the Creator. This leads to disordered views of possessions, which is what drives the clutter in our homes. Walsh's best contribution is giving us tools, questions and patterns to think through the emotions, thoughts and issues behind our junk.

Walsh's recommendations for how to approach the home are good across the board, and they will benefit everyone. The chapters that walk through the average home and provide strategies for de-cluttering and organizing are helpful. But it's the chapters that reveal how we think about our stuff, and how we need to process our emotions relating to our clutter, that really carry the water in this book.

We already had a plan in place to do some purging in the new year, and this book provided a clearer way to think through it than I had before. It honestly helped me get started on our plans, and in a more productive way than I previously had in mind. It was well worth it.

The one note of redirection I will add for my fellow Christians is simple: the control over possessions and environment that Walsh advocates is crucial for reorganizing your life, but it's not the answer. Walsh tells us to ask ourselves "do my possessions will help me have the life I envision?". But, instead we should ask, "do my possessions help me have a life that glorifies God and seeks to see him glorified?"

With that one minor redirection in place, I can heartily recommend this book to anyone. It's definitely better than the cover suggests.