We use the word 'writer' as a noun, as a job description, but really we use it as an honorific title. Those of us who love the written word struggle with how to bestow this title. We look at that word, 'writer', and see so many things. We see books on shelves, we see interviews in The Paris Review, we see a mythic figure, from whose mind springs whole new worlds. For many of us, we see a writer as one who has written, and one whose work was read and approved of by those who matter.

But, there are big differences amongst those who we could call writers. From the New York Times best-selling author, to the humble self-publisher who no one reads, we naturally see authors on a spectrum and only deem those above a certain point to be "writers." And the ones who are the worst about this, who judge success—or lack thereof—most harshly, and hold back the title most stingily are the people who aspire to the title themselves. I don't think we should look at the word that way.

I'm not suggesting that the title 'writer' is something that anyone should be able to lay claim to. Far from it. I think it should be a slippery handhold at the top of a long climb. I think it should be hard to lay your hands on, and hard to hold on to. I think it should be earned.

But if I do not think the title should be bestowed on only the well-reviewed, the best-selling, or the academic darlings, then on what basis would I commission by fellow artists with that precious word? By looking back to the meaning of the word.

A writer is one who writes. We shouldn't use it as a noun, but as a verb—as a description of action.

That should be the ground on which we claim our title, because writing is a practice. A writer must write every day. It is a muscle that withers easily, it is a skill that fades. And if you aspire to be a 'writer', then on that ground you should judge yourself. Are you writing each day? Or most days? Are your projects moving forward? Do your word counts continue to increase? If yes, then count yourself amongst the ink-stained wretches who seek to make their living with just their words and wits.

This post is motivation for me, even in writing it. Because I'm not a writer unless I'm writing. And lately, I haven't been writing. The circumstances don't matter, in these things they hardly ever do. My pen needs to meet paper more. My fingers need to touch the keys each morning. Because that is how you really become a writer.