The newest and fanciest writing tools will not help you to become a more effective, efficient and creative writer. A new piece of software or new notebook alone can't make your writing better.

Let's be honest, good tools are great. Tools help writers out. They can help us out a lot, in fact. But good tools won't make you a good writer. They can make you more efficient or faster, and they may even make your words look better on the screen or page. But they won't make the work better. Only two things will do that: work and time. Together.

There are well-meaning and smarter writers than me who advise other writers not to worry about their tools and simply write. They are correct. Of all the opinions and advice I will offer on this site, my echo on this point is the most important: sit down and write.

I am susceptible to the lie that tools will help my writing. A simple list of past purchases will show how effective the software sirens are at luring me off course. Or the sirens of fancy pens. Or those who peddle fancy notebooks. And on, and on, and on...

What I have learned in my various excursions into the writers' marketplace? Every software or supplies purchase I've made, and will make, is based on one of two impulses: a physical requirement to complete a project, or a hope that it would make the project better. Sadly, there have been far more of the latter.

In the era of web magazines, social media and self-publishing, I believe every writer can benefit from using the right toolset for the job. In fact, this is not even linked to our era. We can certainly see how the switch to papyrus from stone as a medium made life much easier for the scribes of the day. But then, as now, not one scribe's work became better due to an obsession over the details of fine papyrus and the search for the perfect reed pen.

Don't ignore your tools, they are important. Go ahead and try new things out. Sharpen the tools you already have.

But then, sit down and write. Do the work, it's the only way to get better.